We are at the point of a fourth industrial revolution with focus on the digital age, with huge potentials for the growth of technology. Aberdeen currently has a vision becoming the digital capital of the UK, with the aim of digital transformation for the city region, delivering innovation, economic stimulus, and citizen well-being. In a post-oil economy, it is important that Aberdeen ventures into new realms in order to survive and develop successfully, and I believe that Aberdeen has the potential to be the home of a facility with a focus on a new and growing area of research; space. The facility should act as an exciting new opportunity for Aberdeen, something that I believe that it fundamentally lacks.

 

It is in our blood as a species to explore, and the possibility of mars colonisation in the next decade is becoming ever more likely with the exponential growth of technology. It is important that we do not get left behind on this venture. We must also face the reality that our planet is dying due to climate change as a result of high carbon emissions over the past century, and this could be our chance to correct our mistakes as a species and live self-sufficiently.

 

Scotland has a rich history of agriculture and natural environments with a diverse range of species and climate, therefore it seems appropriate to use this locality and project it into the unknown. The facility’s research will be focused on advancing technology that can allow for a self-sufficient life on other planets, through large scale testing and simulation. This will include the research of hydroponic farming as a sustainable food source tested under zero gravity conditions and controlled lighting environments, and a world’s first large scale terraforming lab that simulates the environment on Mars to test plant growth and geoengineering to create a more habitable Earth-like planet. This can also have the wider benefits of solving issues closer to home such as reforestation to help with carbon emissions and tackling the food shortage crisis.

 

RESEARCH

 

Geoengineering:

The process of terraforming Mars through geoengineering to become more Earth like will be the largest task and a long-term investment. First the planet must be warmed up, which can be done by melting Mars’ ice caps to release frozen CO2 to create a thicker layer of atmosphere. This means more protection from solar radiation, and increased warmth due to trapped heat, resulting in ice underground to melt for running water. This can then create a water cycle and seasons and will contribute to a stronger atmosphere.

 

The hardest challenge is making the air breathable, and this will come by making the planet green. Moss and lichens can initially be introduced to help with the breakdown of rocks into soils, they also thrive on carbon dioxide. With soils, we can grow grass successfully and a plant cycle will begin, proving the soil with nutrients and holding water underground. It is trees that are really required to help generate oxygen, the best in this scenario being high altitude trees that allow for undergrowth to continue to flourish – an ideal candidate for this would be a tree native to Scotland, the Scots Pine.

 

Farming:

Hydroponic Farming is a method of growing plants without soil, by using mineral nutrient solutions in water. The method provides a year-round solution to growing crops, regardless of weather and saves massively in water consumption.

 

This method can be applied to give astronauts a fresh and self-sufficient source of food, as well as a source of oxygen. It is also proven that mending to plants has psychological benefits too. For hydroponics in space, several elements need to be tested before it can work effectively. Knowing how light, temperature, carbon dioxide, and pressure affect them will be key to understanding how they will grow.

 

CONCEPT

 

In this project the theme of functionality has been explored. Due to its building type, efficiency has been key in its design, this becomes apparent through the building layout in which each function is derived into its own space. This idea of function and components became an overall theme at macro and micro levels, and so every element is treated as its own component and celebrated as such; the moments where they connect define architectural expression.

 

Structural elements have been explored and expressed to their maximum, taking inspiration from the high-tech architecture of Rogers’ and Foster’s. Every building component has been separated as part of this expression: the layers that build up the envelope; the vertical circulation; structural connections; and service distribution all play a part in this.  By doing so the building becomes “readable”, in that the purpose of everything can be witnessed and understood.

Space Research Facility

Jordan Devenny

Space Research Facility

Jordan Devenny

We are at the point of a fourth industrial revolution with focus on the digital age, with huge potentials for the growth of technology. Aberdeen currently has a vision becoming the digital capital of the UK, with the aim of digital transformation for the city region, delivering innovation, economic stimulus, and citizen well-being. In a post-oil economy, it is important that Aberdeen ventures into new realms in order to survive and develop successfully, and I believe that Aberdeen has the potential to be the home of a facility with a focus on a new and growing area of research; space. The facility should act as an exciting new opportunity for Aberdeen, something that I believe that it fundamentally lacks.

 

It is in our blood as a species to explore, and the possibility of mars colonisation in the next decade is becoming ever more likely with the exponential growth of technology. It is important that we do not get left behind on this venture. We must also face the reality that our planet is dying due to climate change as a result of high carbon emissions over the past century, and this could be our chance to correct our mistakes as a species and live self-sufficiently.

 

Scotland has a rich history of agriculture and natural environments with a diverse range of species and climate, therefore it seems appropriate to use this locality and project it into the unknown. The facility’s research will be focused on advancing technology that can allow for a self-sufficient life on other planets, through large scale testing and simulation. This will include the research of hydroponic farming as a sustainable food source tested under zero gravity conditions and controlled lighting environments, and a world’s first large scale terraforming lab that simulates the environment on Mars to test plant growth and geoengineering to create a more habitable Earth-like planet. This can also have the wider benefits of solving issues closer to home such as reforestation to help with carbon emissions and tackling the food shortage crisis.

 

CONCEPT

 

In this project the theme of functionality has been explored. Due to its building type, efficiency has been key in its design, this becomes apparent through the building layout in which each function is derived into its own space. This idea of function and components became an overall theme at macro and micro levels, and so every element is treated as its own component and celebrated as such; the moments where they connect define architectural expression.

 

Structural elements have been explored and expressed to their maximum, taking inspiration from the high-tech architecture of Rogers’ and Foster’s. Every building component has been separated as part of this expression: the layers that build up the envelope; the vertical circulation; structural connections; and service distribution all play a part in this.  By doing so the building becomes “readable”, in that the purpose of everything can be witnessed and understood.